The Emperor’s New Clothes (TENC) * www.tenc.net

You may send this article or the link to any person or Internet list.  You may post any TENC article on the Internet as long as you cite Emperor’s Clothes as the source, credit the author(s), and state the URL, which in this case is
http://emperors-clothes.com/peaceful-sitins-not.htm

Subscribe to the TENC Newsletter – Receive articles from Emperor’s Clothes.

To subscribe, send a blank email with SUBSCRIBE in the subject line to: emperorsclothes@tenc.net  You will receive a confirmation email within a day.  (If you don’t, please check your email screening filter.)  Please reply to that email and add the Newsletter address to your personal address book: emperorsclothes@tenc.net

Our readers make TENC possible. Please donate!

========================================================

Egypt: Sit-ins?  Or terror camps?  What’s in a name?
by Jared Israel and Samantha Criscione

August 18, 2013

[In this article, all notes in brackets are from Emperor’s Clothes]

========================================================

Table of Contents

I. The New York Times and the State Department claim that
the Egyptian government says it is going to disperse ‘peaceful sit-ins’

II. Reuters claims that Egypt says it is going to suppress “vigils.”  Vigils?

III. Reuters, The New York Times and the State Department are all lying.

What Egypt’s Information Minister really said Egypt was going to do.

IV. Road-blocking 1: Erecting fortifications...

V. ... with gun ports!

VI. Children, indoctrinated to be martyrs, used as human shields

VII. The media discovers that now, for the first time, gambling is going on here

VIII. Road-blocking 2: Traffic disruption, but even better because with automatic weapons

IX. Would the Brotherhood really physically attack people for holding different views?

Example #1: Worker seriously beaten for disparaging Brotherhood chants

X. Would the Brotherhood really physically attack people for holding different views?

Example #2: Video of three men and a boy taken prisoner and beaten inside the Brotherhood’s Rabaa encampment; photo of two men, tied up and beaten – possibly dead – also at Rabaa

XI. Would the Brotherhood really physically attack people for holding different views?

Example #3: Top Brotherhood leaders and doctors indicted for torturing policemen at Rabaa Square encampment

XII. Amnesty International report on torture and murder at Brotherhood’s Rabaa encampment

XIII. Amnesty Report masks role of Brotherhood leadership

========================================================

Western and other governments (for example, Turkey, South Africa and Iran) and the international media have uncritically repeated the Muslim Brotherhood narrative, according to which the Brotherhood and its supporters are peaceful protesters who have organized sit-ins to express their views despite violent repression by the Egyptian military and police.

But is it true?  Should the Brotherhood forces really be called ‘peaceful protesters’?  And should what the Brotherhood organized in Cairo be called ‘sit-ins’?


========================================================

I. The New York Times and the State Department claim that the Egyptian government says it is going to disperse ‘peaceful sit-ins’

========================================================


In writing for the public, what one calls a thing – and what one claims that others call a thing – can be half the battle.

Case in point: About two weeks ago The New York Times published a piece discussing the Egyptian Minister of Information’s July 31 statement concerning Egypt’s response to the Muslim Brotherhood encampment sites in Greater Cairo, one at Rabaa Square in Nasr City and one at Nahda Square near Cairo University’s main campus in Giza, and its response to terrorism.

Here is the first paragraph of the Times article:

“Egypt’s military-backed government instructed its security forces on Wednesday [July 31] to end two sit-ins by tens of thousands of supporters of the deposed Islamist president, a decree that many feared could lead to a new round of violent confrontations.” [1]
[Our emphasis]

The key words here are “sit-ins,” “security forces” and “violent confrontations.”

The term ‘sit-in’ evokes the long history of non-violent actions in which protesters ‘sat in’ at public facilities to disrupt normal functioning, often risking their lives in order to end unjust policies.

Following the sit-in by four black students requesting service at a segregated (white-only) lunch counter in a Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, North Carolina in February 1960, black students organized anti-segregation sit-ins all over the southern United States, with law enforcement authorities and anti-integration whites reacting harshly and often quite brutally, as shown in this photo from the Woolworth sit-in in Jackson, Mississippi on May 27, 1963:

~ What civil rights sit-in participants looked like on May 27, 1963  ~

Associated Press reports that during the May 1963 sit-in at a segregated lunch counter in Jackson, Mississippi, three of whose participants are pictured above:

“Jackson’s finest [i.e., the police] stood outside the Woolworth’s [store] while as many as 300 angry whites were allowed to attack the sit-inners at will.”

And they did attack:

“Some of the Tougaloo [College] students were beaten, and one was knocked unconscious. Others were doused with ketchup, mustard and sugar.” [2]

Picture credit: AP file photo.  (C) Associated Press
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only

~ What the Muslim Brotherhood Rabaa Square ‘sit-in’ participants looked like on June 30, 2013 ~

The caption reads:

“Supporters of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi take part in a drill with makeshift weapons and helmets during a demonstration at the Rabaa al-Adaweya Mosque in the suburb of Nasr City on June 30, 2013 in Cairo, Egypt.” [3]

Can you spot the difference in the above two almost identical images of sit-in participants in Jackson, Mississippi and Cairo?

Here are some clues:

1) In the Jackson, Mississippi sit-in the participants are sitting, not standing, and they are not wearing helmets.

2) In the Jackson, Mississippi sit-in the participants are not conducting a military drill.

3) In the Jackson, Mississippi sit-in the participants were committed to non-violent civil disobedience – meaning, that whatever was done to them they did not fight back – whereas the so-called ‘sit-in’ participants in the picture from Rabaa Square are drilling with steel pipes for smashing people’s heads.

Get the point?

Picture credit: Ed Giles/Getty Images
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only


The New York Times has consistently pictured the Brotherhood actions in Cairo as peaceful protests, opposed by brutal government forces along with “thugs” – a remake of the civil rights sit-ins in the U.S. South in the 1960s.  By claiming that Egypt’s information minister herself had referred to the Brotherhood encampments as “sit-ins,” which the government has “instructed its security forces [...] to end,” the Times attempts to win the public opinion argument in paragraph one.  After all, if the Egyptian authorities themselves concede that they are suppressing peaceful protests in the sit-in tradition, meaning peaceful protests against injustice, despite the possibility of what The New York Times calls “violent confrontations” – just as the ‘forces of law-and-order’ in the South organized “violent confrontations” to crush the anti-segregation sit-ins in the 1960s – then who could defend them?

To confirm this picture of a government using brutality to suppress progressive protest, the Times quotes the U.S. State Department as follows:

“Asked about the new decree [i.e., the Egyptian Minister of Information’s statement] at a daily State Department briefing in Washington, the deputy spokeswoman, Marie Harf, said: ‘We have continued to urge the interim government officials and security forces to respect the right of peaceful assembly. That obviously includes sit-ins.’ ” (See footnote [1].)
[Our emphasis]

By reporting that it has continually admonished Egyptian authorities “to respect the right of peaceful assembly,” the State Department tells us that a) the Egyptian authorities do not respect the right of peaceful assembly (else why would the U.S. government have to keep admonishing them?), and b) the assemblies that the Muslim Brotherhood has been organizing are peaceful (else what “right of peaceful assembly” would the U.S. government be talking about respecting?).

What The New York Times neglects to tell us is that the Egyptian government has rejected the State Department’s underlying thesis, namely that the Brotherhood has been organizing peaceful sit-ins.

There has been tremendous U.S. and European pressure on the Egyptians to tone down their condemnation of Brotherhood actions, and to a limited extent that pressure has been successful.  Nevertheless, as we will see in a moment, Egypt’s information minister did not say that security forces had been ordered to stop peaceful sit-in protests.  Rather, she said they had been ordered to stop organized violence, massive disruption, and terror.

The Egyptians say to the U.S. government, ‘We cannot tolerate the Brotherhood’s terrorist acts!’

The U.S. and European governments reply, for public consumption, ‘You Egyptians must learn to tolerate the Brotherhood’s peaceful protests!’


========================================================

II. Reuters claims that Egypt says it is going to suppress vigils. Vigils?

========================================================

Reuters went even further than The New York Times:

[Excerpt from Reuters dispatch, “Egypt’s rulers want to break up Brotherhood vigils,” starts here]

With no sign of a negotiated end to weeks of violent confrontation, Egypt’s interim government said two Cairo vigils by Mursi supporters posed a threat to national security, citing “terrorism” and traffic disruption.

It ordered the Interior Ministry to take steps to “address these dangers and put an end to them,” but gave no time frame.
[4]

[Our emphasis]

[Excerpt from Reuters dispatch, “Egypt’s rulers want to break up Brotherhood vigils,” ends here]

Two points about this excerpt.

First, according to Reuters the Egyptian government stated that “two Cairo vigils” “posed a threat to national security,” and that therefore the Interior Ministry must “ ‘put and end to them.’ ”

This is quite remarkable, because a vigil is the least threatening form of political action, only slightly more militant than a slumber party.  In the most popular type, the candlelight vigil:

“people gather, light candles, and show their support [...] for a cause, to remember an important date, to quietly protest [...]  The main point of a candlelight vigil is to provide a quiet and comfortable setting where groups of people can meet, support each other, and spread a message.” [5]
[Our emphasis]

Since only a fiercely intolerant and repressive government would suppress a vigil, and since, according to Reuters, that is precisely what the Egyptian government has said it aims to do, it would have to follow that, according to Reuters, the Egyptian government is, according to its own declaration, fiercely intolerant and repressive.

Or anyway, it would have to follow if Reuters were telling the truth.

Second, Reuters asserts that:

“Egypt’s interim government said two Cairo vigils by Mursi supporters posed a threat to national security, citing ‘terrorism’ and traffic disruption.” (See footnote [4].)
[Our emphasis]

In claiming that Egypt is saying that the threat to national security comes from “ ‘terrorism’ and traffic disruption,” Reuters makes said government sound as if it were competing with Thomas De Quincey’s wonderful absurdity:

“For if once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing; and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbath-breaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination.  Once begin upon this downward path, you never know where you are to stop.  Many a man has dated his ruin from some murder or other that perhaps he thought little of at the time.” [6]

========================================================

III. Reuters, The New York Times and the State Department are all lying.
What Egypt’s Information Minister really said Egypt was going to do.


========================================================

Here are information minister Dorreya Sharaf El-Din’s actual remarks, as quoted on Ahram Online, the English website of Al Ahram, the main government-owned newspaper:

[Excerpt from “Pro-Morsi rallies no longer acceptable” starts here]

“Based on the mandate given by the people to the state, and in preservation of the country’s higher interest, the cabinet has delegated the interior ministry to proceed with all legal measures to confront acts of terrorism and road-blocking,” said interim information minister Dorreya Sharaf El-Din in a cabinet statement Wednesday evening.

“The cabinet has reviewed the country’s security situation and has concluded that the dangerous situation in Rabaa and Nahda Squares, including the terrorist acts and road-blocking that has occurred, is no longer acceptable as it constitutes a threat to the country’s national security,” El-Din added.
[7]

[Excerpt from “Pro-Morsi rallies no longer acceptable” ends here]

So, there is no reference to “vigils” or “sit-ins,” or to “traffic disruption,” as variously claimed by The New York Times, Reuters and the U.S. Department of State.

Rather, Minister of Information El-Din said that “the dangerous situation in Rabaa and Nahda Squares” was unacceptable, for reasons including “terrorist acts and road-blocking.”

It appears that in the interest of providing the public with a suitable news experience – pro-Brotherhood and demeaning to the Egyptian government – the U.S. government, The New York Times and Reuters rewrote the Egyptian government statement.

(By the way, there is also no reference to “Pro-Morsi rallies” being “no longer acceptable,” as claimed in the headline quoted above from Ahram Online.  As we will discuss shortly, Ahram Online has many virtues but alas represents the most pro-Brotherhood elements in the Egyptian government, and slants the news accordingly).

Let us consider this matter of “road-blocking.”


========================================================

IV. Road-blocking 1: Erecting fortifications...

========================================================

Muslim Brotherhood “road blocking” is not the same as “traffic disruption.”  It involves two practices.

The first is the Brotherhood sport of ripping up the streets and using the paving stones to build fortifications across major arteries, such as the ones the Brotherhood erected across Cairo’s very busy (12 lane!) Nasr Road, in Rabaa Square, shown below in a photo taken July 28:

From the ‘vigil’ – as Reuters calls it – at Rabaa Square, a little ‘traffic disruption’ – as Reuters calls it – for the purpose of providing “a quiet and comfortable setting where groups of people can meet, support each other, and spread a message.”

Picture credit: Al-Masry Al-Youm
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only.


Two points about this photo.

First, the caption at Egypt Independent reads:

“Pro-Morsy protesters place barriers on Nasr road.” [8]

We beg to differ. These structures, which are part of the Brotherhood encampment around Cairo’s Rabaa Square, are not “barriers” at all but military fortifications.  If we are wrong, if the Brotherhood did not build these structures for military purposes, why did they build them?

Second, have you seen the above photo anywhere besides on Emperor’s Clothes?  We have searched and can only find it in Egyptian media. Why?  We think because if it had been widely circulated outside Egypt, it would have rendered the media’s talk of “sit-ins” ludicrous.


========================================================

V. ...with gun ports!

========================================================

Look at the following one-minute video, posted by the website of the Egyptian newspaper Youm7, depicting the structures the Brotherhood has erected in front of Cairo University in Nahda Square in Giza.  With these particular structures, the Muslim Brotherhood used sandbags rather than paving stones.

Do you see something very revealing about this video?

Note: The video above was posted on Youtube on July 31, 2013 by the Egyptian newspaper Youm7.  If for some reason you cannot view it, please go to
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pO0FmD96n6E


The Brotherhood claims these sandbag fortifications are only intended to block police vehicles from attacking them.  But then why are they all over the Nahda Square area, on roads, walkways, lawns?

Youm7’s title for this video translates:

“Sand berms in front of Cairo University, with openings for shooting
[Our emphasis]

“Openings for shooting”?

‘Berms’ are fortifications.  Did you spot the gun ports in this fortification?

Here is a still shot from the video, with the gun ports circled and marked one through eight:

To see the above picture full size, go here.


Below we have posted enlarged details, dividing the eight gun ports between two pictures:


These images, which no media outside Egypt have shown except Emperor’s Clothes, give the lie to what the media have been telling us, namely that the Brotherhood has organized peaceful sit-ins.

What kind of ‘peaceful sit-in’ is surrounded by massive sandbag fortifications, with weapons ports spaced every meter or less?

And what kind of government would tolerate fortified encampments blocking off huge areas in the capital city?

And then there is the problem of the children.


========================================================

VI. Children, indoctrinated to be martyrs, used as human shields

========================================================

Children have been photographed and videotaped in and around the Brotherhood encampments, dressed in white, in planned preparation for becoming martyrs:

Children in coffins against 'coup'

Picture credit: Al-Masry Al-Youm
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only.


The Egypt Independent caption for the photo above, posted on July 29, 2013 reads:

“Children against Coup stage march around Rabea al-Adaweya sit-in, Nasr City.” [9]

Two points about the photo.

First, the children in the photo are dressed in white shrouds because they are would-be martyrs.

Second, regarding the caption, the phrase ‘Children against Coup’ is what the Brotherhood calls these children.  In fact they are – children!  That is, they are innocents, with no understanding -- neither right nor, as with the Brotherhood, quite wrong -- of Egyptian affairs, and therefore their use here as martyrs-in-waiting does not constitute a political statement on their part, but an abuse of them by fascists who want child martyrs to create sympathy for their cause.

A short video of the same so-called demonstration of the little children, ready to die for Mohamed Morsi, can be seen below:

Note: The video above was posted on Youtube on July 29, 2013 by the Egyptian newspaper Al Dostor.  If for some reason you cannot view it, please go to
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8u--Y_M5QPM


The Brotherhood is using these children as human shields, a criminal act, and teaching them to look forward to death:

[Excerpt from August 2 article, “National Council for Childhood: Morsy supporters exploit children, orphans” starts here]

Secretary general of the National Council for Childhood and Motherhood Nasr al-Sayed said at a conference on Friday that the council appealed to local, Arab, and international media to prevent the exploitation of children in demonstrations and conflicts.

Sayed said: “Children were used as human shields in all demonstrations demanding the return of toppled President Mohamed Morsy during the current month, and put on top of coffins.”

“We have information that the children were brought from one of the orphanages in Nasr City.”

Sayed said children were used during the Ramses Square and October 6 Bridge violence and that two children were locked inside Fatah Mosque for over 12 hours with other protesters.

Sayed said that the media circulated a photo of a child who had “I am Hamza: a probable martyr” written on his T-shirt. Sayed criticized the incident saying the child’s mother was killing her son’s innocence.

[...]

Sayed showed a video during the conference of children at the pro-Morsy protests carrying coffins and singing “We are all probable martyrs.
[10]

[Our emphasis]

[Excerpt from August 2 article, “National Council for Childhood: Morsy supporters exploit children, orphans” ends here]

Again, we cannot find this photo and video anywhere in the mainstream media, outside Egypt.  Was Emperor’s Clothes able to find them, but The Washington Post, The New York Times and other leading newspapers around the world were not?  Obviously such media, some of whose reporters and researchers spend all their time collecting information about Egypt, are aware of these images and similar ones.

So why have the international media not shown us the children of the so-called ‘sit-ins,’ dressed for death?  Why have they instead shown us images of children playing, as if the Rabaa and Nahda encampments were summer camps?

Because if the international media did show the public the reality of Muslim Brotherhood abuse and terror, then public support for the “sit-ins” would vanish, and people would demand that their governments stop sponsoring the Muslim Brotherhood monstrosity.


=========================================================

VII. The media discovers now, for the first time, that gambling is going on here

========================================================

As we prepared this article for posting, we noticed that various media (for example, The Washington Post
[11] ) are reporting that now (August 11 and 12) the Brotherhood has begun fortifying their two encampments, supposedly in order to prepare for an imminent confrontation with police.

But the video, “Sand berms in front of Cairo University, with openings for shooting,” embedded above, was not posted on Youtube on August 11, it was posted on July 31, meaning the footage was possibly shot before then.

And the photo of the massive fortifications blocking Nasr Road in Rabaa Square, also posted above, was taken on July 28.

In an Ahram Online video with English subtitles posted on Youtube on July 26, a resident of a building in the area of the Rabaa Square encampment reports that the Brotherhood people have pulled up paving stones to build fortifications (as well as siphoning gas from residents’ cars, to make Molotov cocktails), meaning that these fortifications did not start being erected August 11 or 12, they started being erected earlier than July 26.
[12]

Confirming this, we found several photos of fortifications already constructed on July 18, such as this photo of Brotherhood guards searching a woman before allowing her to enter or pass through the Rabaa Square encampment (which blocks major roads and the entrances to huge building-complexes in the area):

The Associated Press caption reads:

“Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi check women at sand barriers recently set up for women to enter where protesters have installed their camp at Nasr City in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, July 18, 2013.  Pro-Morsi protesters continued their sit-in in front of the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo for the third week.  Residents of the area have complained blocking the roads and using nearby gardens for washing and sewage purposes.  Since Morsi was toppled by the military in the most recent uprising, protesters vowed to remain on the streets till he is back to presidency and called the transition a coup.” [13]

Picture credit: Hussein Malla/Associated Press.
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only.


And as for the generally militaristic character of the Brotherhood so-called ‘sit-ins,’ the picture of Brotherhood men in military drill at the Rabaa Square encampment, wearing helmets and carrying long, steel pipes, posted above, was shot on June 30, that is, six weeks before the media reports that the Brotherhood was finally militarizing their encampments.

By failing – for six weeks! – to report the fact that the Brotherhood encampments are military installations, which for at least two weeks have been fortified with gun ports, while presenting said encampments as peaceful ‘sit-ins,’ and then, on August 11 and 12, reporting the lie that the Brotherhood ‘sit-ins’ are now, for the first time, being militarized, the media has shown that a) it did not fail to report that these are military fortifications due to ignorance, but rather b) said failure was a conscious act of deceit intended to encourage international public sympathy and support for the Brotherhood.

Will the media also report that, facing the possibility of repression, the Brotherhood is now for the first time acquiring automatic weapons?  Because in fact the Brotherhood has had automatic weapons for weeks (and, one would assume, much longer) as well.

Regarding which, see, “Road-blocking 2,” below.


========================================================

VIII. Road-blocking 2: Traffic disruption, but even better because with automatic weapons

========================================================

In their second type of road blocking, Brotherhood forces foray out of their Rabaa and Nahda encampments, blockading busy highways and instigating pitched battles with motorists, with the Brotherhood people using weapons, including automatic rifles, thus forcing police to intervene, following which the Brotherhood broadcasts to the receptive world media that once again a police state has suppressed peaceful protest.  You know, a vigil.

Here is an example from Ahram Online, reporting on July 23:

[“Morsi supporters and opponents exchange fire in Giza” starts here]

According to the report [from Al Ahram’s Arabic-language website], a pro-Morsi march disrupted traffic while heading to Giza Square, which prompted violence between the protesters and drivers. At some point, unknown assailants on the Giza Bridge opened fire on the march.

During the melee, Morsi’s supporters moved to the Giza Bridge and retaliated with automatic weapons and birdshot, before some of the residents joined the fight against them [i.e., against the Brotherhood].

Later on, central security forces were sent to the area and have successfully contained the situation.
[14]

[“Morsi supporters and opponents exchange fire in Giza” ends here]

Under Morsi’s presidency, the Brotherhood took over management control of the government-owned newspaper Al Ahram and its websites, including Ahram Online and Ahram Weekly, and this Brotherhood management team is apparently still in place despite tremendous opposition from reporters, with the result that even though Ahram Online gives readers much more information about Egypt than non-Egyptian media, its reporting is generally slanted in the Brotherhood’s favor.  (And it seems to be getting much worse.) [15]

For example, in the second paragraph of the above account, Ahram Online claims that local residents only joined the fight against the Brotherhood after “unknown assailants” fired on the Brotherhood people, causing the Brotherhood forces to fire back with automatic weapons.

Aside from the question, ‘What were the Brotherhood people doing carrying automatic weapons in the first place, if they were just trying to ‘peacefully assemble to express a view’?’ – peaceful protesters with AK47s? – notice that in the first paragraph, Ahram has stated:

“a pro-Morsi march disrupted traffic while heading to Giza Square, which prompted violence between the protesters and drivers.”
(See footnote
[14] .)
[Our emphasis]

Two points about this.

First of all, surely at least some of those drivers were local residents, meaning that the Brotherhood forces were fighting with local residents from the start.

And second of all, this raises the question, why?  Why would the drivers be fighting with the Brotherhood forces?

During the year that Morsi was president, Egypt had a record-breaking 9427 protests
[16] , which often involved traffic delays, without this resulting in pitched battles.  Why was there a battle in this particular case?

We can think of two possible answers.

First possibility: the Brotherhood did not disrupt traffic in Giza as a consequence of passing through.  Rather it set up a human roadblock, for the express purpose of blocking traffic, thus in effect demonstrating against the drivers.  Why?  Because, 71% of Egyptians (and most likely more in the Greater Cairo area) oppose the Brotherhood campaign to get Morsi reinstated.
[17]  Hence, the way the Brotherhood sees things, the vast majority of those drivers in Giza were surely enemies and therefore deserved to be punished.  And since Egyptians do not like being pushed around, the drivers got out of their cars and argued with the Brotherhood people, leading the Brotherhood people to do what they always do when anyone disagrees with them – they tried to beat them up [18] , and the drivers fought back.

Second possibility: the drivers disagreed with the slogans the Brotherhood people were chanting, and some got out of their cars and told them why they thought they were wrong, leading the Brotherhood people to do what they always do when anyone tells them they are wrong – they tried to beat them up, and the drivers fought back.

As for the business about “unknown assailants” being the first to open fire on the Brotherhood, of course we cannot possibly know whether this is true or false, but consider: since Ahram Online states that the Brotherhood people were carrying automatic rifles (!), isn’t it probable if not certain that when they got into a fight with the drivers, some of the Brotherhood people fired those automatic rifles (why else were they carrying them?), and that then, as onlookers joined the fight on the drivers’ side, the Brotherhood forces retreated to the Giza Bridge in a fury, firing on everyone?

Anyway, this is what “road blocking” means:  a) the erection of huge  fortifications, at least some with gun slits, blocking major arteries, and b) roads seized, followed by pitched battles, with some of the Brotherhood people using automatic weapons.

Is that what U.S. State Department spokesperson Marie Harf had in mind when she told reporters:

“We have continued to urge the interim government officials and security forces to respect the right of peaceful assembly. That obviously includes sit-ins.”
(See footnote
[1] .)

And there is more.


========================================================

IX. Would the Brotherhood really physically attack people for holding different views?

Example #1: Worker seriously beaten for disparaging Brotherhood chants

========================================================

As anyone who has ever walked past a peace vigil knows, the participants are more than ready to explain their points of view, sometimes more thoroughly than one might wish.  In general, they are patient – they would have to be to stand there holding candles for hours on end – so of course they listen to dissenting views.  All part of the vigil experience.

How does the Brotherhood handle said experience?

Consider this account of what happened to a man on his way to work, who told Brotherhood demonstrators he disagreed with some of their chants:

[Excerpt from “Fresh allegations of torture at pro-Morsy rallies” starts here]

A seriously injured man found by security guards outside a military-owned factory in Helwan shows signs of being tortured by supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsy, state-run news agency MENA quoted a security source as saying.

The allegation comes after rights group Amnesty International published a report claiming there was “evidence, including testimonies from survivors,” that torture is being used at pro-Morsy sit-ins in Giza’s al-Nahda Square and Rabea al-Adaweya in Nasr City.

The security source told MENA that investigators in Cairo received a report from Helwan Public Hospital that a 25-year-old man, Yasser Ahmed Abdel Atty, had been brought to the hospital.

The report said Abdel Atty, who works at a workshop in Cairo’s Menshiyet Nasser, had sustained bruises on several parts of his body, and his wrists showed signs of being bound.

Abdel Atty told investigators he was on his way to work near Nasr City two days ago when he ran into a pro-Morsy march.

The man said he spoke with demonstrators and voiced his discontent with some of the chants. Protesters then took him by force to Rabea al-Adawiya Square, tied him up inside a tent and began to beat him, he added.

Abdel Atty was blindfolded, bundled into a car and dropped off next to the factory where he was later found, the report said.

Abdel Atty also claimed his mobile phone was stolen.

An Amnesty International report published Friday said testimonies from anti-Morsy protesters indicated they were captured, beaten, given electric shocks or stabbed by Morsy loyalists close to the two rallies.
[19]

[Our emphasis]

[Excerpt from “Fresh allegations of torture at pro-Morsy rallies” ends here]


========================================================

X. Would the Brotherhood really physically attack people for holding different views?

Example #2: Video of three men and a boy taken prisoner and beaten inside the Brotherhood’s Rabaa encampment; photo of two men, tied up and beaten – possibly dead – also at Rabaa

========================================================

Below is a video shot from a window or balcony in one of the huge residential buildings around which the Rabaa Square encampment in Cairo was set up.  The video is raw footage, consisting of four video sequences, in which we see Rabaa Square encampment lynch mobs, including a large number of Brotherhood security guards wearing bright orange day-glo vests and Brotherhood militia members wearing colored helmets, with some members of both groups being armed with steel pipes, who have beaten, and in two of the four cases are still violently beating, three men and a boy whom they have captured.  Apparently the security guards are under orders to question these people and therefore do not allow the encampment inmates to kill them immediately.

We do not know the ‘offenses’ of these victims; perhaps they disagreed with the Brothers, or perhaps the Brotherhood knows or suspects that they are anti-Brotherhood activists, or perhaps some Brotherhood militia captured them near the encampment just in order to supply the demanded quota of torture detainees.

Note, June 15, 2016: Originally, we embedded above a video entitled, “Live footage of torture, captured by a hidden camera at Rabaa Adaweya,” which had been posted on YouTube on August 4, 2013.  For some reason that video was taken down.  However, we found a copy of the video, posted under the title, "Beaten and tortured inside the sit-in of brotherhood on Rabaa Square - Cairo." If for some reason you cannot view the video here, trying going direct to the YouTube URL, which is
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggTRkn-ojTs 
Or view it at http://emperors-clothes.com/torture-rabaa.htm

1) 0:00-0:54
A man in dark t-shirt and slacks is held by members of a mob, repeatedly beaten by many people, some with clubs, including by Brotherhood security guards (wearing day-glo orange vests) and Brotherhood militia (with colored helmets) and is being taken somewhere in the encampment, when that segment ends.

2) 0:54-1:17
A man in white t-shirt and dark slacks is rapidly and violently beaten by a mob and then half-walked half-dragged by five men to an undisclosed location. Men wearing the day-glo orange vests of the Rabaa Square encampment Brotherhood security force are active in the beating and the moving of this man. One of the five men who walk/drag him away is wearing an orange vest.

3) 1:17-1:31
A man in yellow t-shirt, covered with blood, and red slacks has already been severely beaten and is now being taken away by a group of security guards in orange day-glo vests.

4) 1:31-1:48
A boy who has obviously been beaten is taken somewhere in the camp. The group escorting him includes one man carrying a long steel pipe.


Here is a photo taken secretly – and bravely – on July 27, 2013 by a resident of one of the buildings in the area of the Rabaa Square encampment.

At first glance it appears that members of the encampment have tied up and blindfolded one man, gagging him with what appears to be heavy tape, and are torturing him:

To see the above picture full size, go here.

The picture above was posted on August 2, 2013 on the Facebook page of “SOS Residents of Rabaa Adaweya,” a group of local residents who document the acts of destruction and terror perpetrated by Muslim Brotherhood forces at their encampment in and around Rabaa Adaweya Square in Nasr City.


But looking at the blow-ups that we have posted below, one can see that there is in fact a second victim:


* * *

Note added July 16, 2013:

After police cleared the two encampments:

“Police forces found more than 20 bodies below the platform [also referred to as ‘the speakers’ podium’] at Cairo’s Rabaa al-Adaweya Square, al-Hayah news channel reported on Wednesday.” [20]

Who knows how many people the Brotherhood tortured and killed in their Greater Cairo area encampments?  And who knows how many of the bodies of people supposedly killed by police when they cleared the encampments were in fact victims of Brotherhood torture that were conveniently produced when the encampments were being cleared, as evidence of government brutality?  The Brotherhood is notorious for murdering people and then claiming the victims are Brotherhood members murdered by “unknown assailants.”  Indeed the Brotherhood’s modus operandi is to provoke, to beat up, torture and/or kill, and then to loudly proclaim its victimhood. [21]


========================================================

XI. Would the Brotherhood really physically attack people for holding different views?

Example #3: Top Brotherhood leaders and doctors(!) indicted for torturing policemen at Rabaa Square encampment

========================================================

Below is a report from Ahram Online:

[Excerpt from “The trial of leading Brotherhood figures on charges of torture at a pro-Morsi sit-in” starts here]

The Court of Cassation has set the date for the trial of senior Muslim Brotherhood figure Mohamed El-Beltagi and Islamic preacher Safwat Hegazy [who is also a Brotherhood leader] on charges of detaining and torturing two policemen at the sit-in being staged by supporters of Mohamed Morsi in Rabaa Al-Adawiya Square.

Also facing trial on the same accusations are two doctors who work at the sit-in field hospital, Mohamed Mahmoud Ali El-Zanaty and Abdel-Azim Ibrahim.

The four are accused of detaining two policemen during a pro-Morsi rally, keeping them in the vicinity of the sit-in, and physically assaulting them.

Several media reports have suggested that torture has been carried out at the pro-Morsi camps at Rabaa and in Al-Nahda Square in Giza.

On 2 August, Amnesty International issued a statement saying it has collected evidence and testimonies that point towards torture at the [Brotherhood encampment] sites.

The statement said that at least eight bodies arrived at the morgue in Cairo between late June and 28 July, and at least five of these were found near areas where pro-Morsi sit-ins were being held.

[...]

On 25 August, a Cairo criminal court will begin the trial of six Brotherhood leaders – including Supreme Guide Mohamed Badie and his deputy Khairat El-Shater – on charges of inciting the murder of protesters at the Brotherhood’s headquarters in the Cairo district of Moqattam.
[22]

[Excerpt from “The trial of leading Brotherhood figures on charges of torture at a pro-Morsi sit-in” ends here]


========================================================

XII. Amnesty International discusses torture and murder at the Brotherhood’s Rabaa encampment

========================================================

Here is a summary of the Amnesty International report mentioned above, concerning torture, rape and killing at the Brotherhood’s encampments at Rabaa Square in Nasr City and Nahda Square in Giza:

[“Witness reports suggest torture at pro-Morsi sit-ins” starts here]

Amnesty International said it has collected evidence that points at torture carried out at sit-ins by deposed president Mohamed Morsi’s supporters.

The international organisation said in a report released on Friday that “anti-Morsi protesters” have recounted how they were “captured, beaten, subjected to electric shocks or stabbed.”

Mastour Mohamed Sayed, 21, told Amnesty that he and a group of 20 others were attacked by a group of Morsi supporters near the pro-Morsi sit-in at Rabaa Al-Adawiya in Cairo’s Nasr City district on 5 July.

According to the report, his attackers wore balaclavas and some were armed with knives or machine guns.

“We were eventually held under a podium [in the sit-in]…I was beaten with bars, and given electric shocks. I lost consciousness a few times,” he said.

Sayed also told Amnesty he believed he heard a woman being sexually assaulted.

“My hands were tied behind my back, and I was blindfolded, but I could see a bit from underneath the blindfold… I could hear the girl screaming when she was given electric shocks. I could also hear a woman ordering her to take off her clothes. At that stage, I said that this was haram (forbidden), and was hit on the head. I then saw two bearded men go into the room and heard the girl screaming more…”

Sayed said his captors asked why he and other detainees supported General Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, who led the army’s move to remove Morsi amid mass nationwide protests on 3 July. Sayed was then reportedly allowed to leave the sit-in, but his identity card was not returned to him.

According to the report, eight bodies have arrived at the morgue in Cairo bearing signs of torture. Five of them were found near areas where pro-Morsi sit-ins were being held.

Egypt’s interior minister also stated cases of the alleged torture in a press conference last Saturday, saying nine were found dead and ten still receiving treatment.

“Six people were found dead in Al-Nahda Square [in Giza] and three others are in critical condition in the hospital, while three were killed in Rabaa Al-Adawiya [in Nasr City] and seven remain hospitalised,” he said.

According to Amnesty’s report, witnesses near Al-Nahda sit-in reported seeing people murdered.

Hassan Sabry, 20, said that he was dragged by armed assailants into Oumran Garden [in the Nahda Square encampment], near Cairo University in Giza.

“They used plastic wires to handcuff me…They started to beat us with sticks all over the body. At least two of us were bleeding,” he said.

Sabry then watched a bloodied protester have his throat slit and another being stabbed to death, according to the report.

The organisation called for an immediate investigation into the issue.

Allegations that torture is being carried out by individuals are extremely serious and must be investigated as a matter of urgency,” said Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa at Amnesty.
[23]

[Ellipses as in original; our emphasis]

[“Witness reports suggest torture at pro- sit-ins” ends here]

========================================================

XIII. Amnesty Report masks role of Brotherhood leadership

========================================================

Two points about the Amnesty International report.

First, having studied Amnesty, it is our observation that the organization has a pro-Islamist bias, which makes the report all the more significant because it suggests that the terrorism of the Brotherhood encampments is so well known in Egypt that Amnesty’s North Africa division, which is viewed with suspicion by many Egyptians because it has attacked the interim government, is compelled to talk about Brotherhood terrorism in order to maintain an appearance of even-handedness.

Second, Amnesty’s pro-Islamist bias manifests itself in the report’s conclusion that:

“Allegations that torture is being carried out by individuals are extremely serious.”

Since any act of torture (or, for that matter, any other human action) must, of necessity, be carried out by one or more individuals, there is no reason for Amnesty to use this wording unless it is trying to suggest that terror at the two Brotherhood encampments (Rabaa and Nahda Squares) is the work of people acting on their own, not carrying out the orders of Muslim Brotherhood leaders.  Mavericks, if you will.

There are a few problems with this claim.

First, how could Amnesty possibly know?  Since Amnesty presents no evidence that the torturers have been acting independently of Brotherhood leaders, why put Amnesty’s reputation behind this claim unless the intention is to protect the Brotherhood as an organization, even as Amnesty agrees – as Amnesty is compelled to agree in order to maintain credibility – that Brotherhood critics have been tortured and killed at the Rabaa and Nahda encampments?

Second, what is the probability that the torturers have been acting on their own? We would say it is zero, for several reasons.

A) The Amnesty report, and indeed all reports based on witness accounts, describe victims as being tortured inside the Rabaa Square and Nahda Square encampments.  But these encampments have been under military (or, rather, paramilitary) discipline, with all entrances barricaded and members of the Brotherhood militia checking identification of everyone who tries to enter.  That is confirmed by photos of the two encampments, such as the one below, taken July 25, showing men being searched at one of the entrances to the Rabaa Square encampment, which is in the Nasr City section of Cairo.  Notice the long steel pipe, leaning on the sandbags next to the Brotherhood guard on your right:

The Associated Press caption reads:

“Supporters of Egypt’s ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi check identifications at Nasr City [that would be the Rabaa Square encampment] where protesters have installed their camp and hold their daily rally, in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, July 25, 2013. The Muslim Brotherhood’s leader on Thursday made an unusually harsh attack on Egypt’s military chief, saying his ouster of President Mohammed Morsi was a worse crime than even destroying the Kaaba, Islam’s holiest shrine.” [24]

Picture credit: Hassan Ammar/Associated Press.
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only.


Here is another photo showing men being searched at the Rabaa encampment, this one taken on July 18.  Notice the steel pipe held by the watchful guard in the yellow helmet on your right:

The Associated Press caption reads:

“Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi check a man at a checkpoint where protesters have installed their camp at Nasr city in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, July 18, 2013. Pro-Morsi protesters continued their sit-in in front of the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo for the third week. Residents of the area have complained blocking the roads and using nearby gardens for washing and sewage purposes. Since Morsi was toppled by the military in the most recent uprising, protesters vowed to remain on the streets till he is back to presidency and called the transition a coup.” [25]

Picture credit: Hussein Malla/Associated Press.
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only.


How could the culprits drag their victims into the encampments without the approval of the guards at the entrances, who in turn act based on orders from their superiors, who in turn are under the command of the Muslim Brotherhood leaders?

The answer is, they could not.  This point is decisive; but there is more.

B) An Amnesty witness speaks of multiple groups of people being tortured under the podium (that is, the speakers’ stage) at the Rabaa encampment, with a “girl screaming when she was given electric shocks.”

Since top Muslim Brotherhood leaders, some of whom are wanted for extremely serious offenses (for example, Mohamed El-Beltagi and Safwat Hegazy, as described above), have been regularly speaking from the podium, it follows that, in order to protect those leaders, the podium would be among the most highly guarded parts of the Rabaa encampment, if not the most highly guarded, with special attention paid to securing hidden areas (such as the makeshift rooms under the podium) where assassins could lurk.  Why would maverick individuals attempt to torture people in this most carefully guarded spot, and, moreover, how could they possibly carry out tortures – with people screaming in pain, mind you – under the noses of the Brotherhood security personnel, without the Brotherhood leaders knowing what was going on?

Obviously, they could not.

C) Despite the media babble about “sit-ins” and “vigils,” as if we were talking about a loose assembly of Quakers out to Ban the Bomb, the Brotherhood is a clerical fascist sect with a highly disciplined hierarchical structure.  As Associated Press, which is generally pro-Brotherhood, reported in a momentary attack of accuracy, Mohamed Badie is the Brotherhood’s Supreme Guide, and:

“The gray-haired Badie is a revered figure among the Brotherhood’s followers, who swear an oath of absolute obedience to him — to ‘hear and obey.’ ” [26]
[Our emphasis]

“To hear and obey.”

If torturing opponents were against Brotherhood policy, the leaders would have  stopped it cold.  But in fact, as indicated above, top Brotherhood leaders El-Beltagi and Hegazy have themselves been indicted for torturing two policemen, with the help of two Muslim Brotherhood doctors.

We – and the Egyptian people! – say the Brotherhood is a band of clerical fascist thugs, and that is why the Egyptians rose up and demanded, ‘Morsi Out!’

The Reuters caption reads:

“Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi hold up signs during a protest demanding that Mursi resign at Tahrir Square in Cairo July 2, 2013. Egypt’s army reprised its role as hero in a new act of the country’s political drama on Monday with a move celebrated by protesters as a decisive blow against an unpopular president just two and half years after the military unseated his predecessor.” [27]

Picture credit: Suhaib Salem/Reuters.
Posted here for educational purposes. For Fair Use Only.


-- Jared Israel and Samantha Criscione
Emperor’s Clothes


* * *

Footnotes and Further Reading follows the Fundraising Appeal


========================================================

Emperor’s Clothes Needs Your Donation!

========================================================

Emperor’s Clothes needs your help!

By choice, we accept no advertising, so our only source of funding is donations from our readers.  If you can afford a donation, whether it is $5, $50 or $500, please donate today.  Every donation helps!

Our best is yet to come!

Here’s how to make a donation to Emperor’s Clothes:

* You can using PayPal
If the PayPal button does not work, please go to
https://paypal.com/xclick/business=emperors1000@aol.com&no_shipping=1

* Or donate using the Emperor’s Clothes secure server

* Or send a check to:
Emperor’s Clothes
P.O. Box 610-321
Newton, MA 02461-0321
USA

* Or donate by calling 1 617 858-0944
If you get voice mail, please leave your number
and we will call you back.

Thank you!


========================================================

Footnotes and Further Reading

========================================================

[1] “Egypt Vows to End Sit-Ins by Supporters of Deposed President,” by Kareem Fahim and Rick Gladstone, The New York Times, July 31, 2013

[2] “Miss. notes 50th anniversary of Woolworth’s sit-in,” The Associated Press, May 27, 2013

[3] See, “Anti-Morsi Protests in Egypt: Pictures,” by MSN News, July 2, 2013. Picture #7, (C) Ed Giles/Getty Images:

[4] “Egypt’s rulers want to break up Brotherhood vigils,” by Asma Alsharif and Maggie Fick, Cairo, Reuters, Thursday, August 1, 2013 12:17am BST

[5] From, “How to organize a Candlelight Vigil?” by Carrie Grosvenor, as posted on a website that sells candles:
http://candles.lovetoknow.com/How_to_Organize_a_Candlelight_Vigil

[6] Thomas De Quincey, “Second Paper on Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts” (1839), in De Quincey’s writings, edited by James Thomas Fields, Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1851-70, Vol. 3: Miscellaneous Essays, 1851, p. 63
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moa/abk0213.0003.001/63

[7] “Pro-Morsi rallies no longer acceptable: Egyptian cabinet,” Ahram Online, Wednesday, 31 July, 2013

[8] Photo: “Pro-Morsy protesters place barriers on Nasr road,” Photographer: Al-Masry Al-Youm, Capture Date: Sunday, July 28, 2013 – 17:01

Egypt Independent is the English-language website of the Egyptian newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm, which owns the rights to this photo.

[9] Photo: “Children against Coup stage march around Rabea al-Adaweya sit-in, Nasr City,” Photographer: Al-Masry Al-Youm, Capture Date: Monday, July 29, 2013 – 16:09

Egypt Independent is the English-language website of the Egyptian newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm, which owns the rights to this photo.

[10] “National Council for Childhood: Morsy supporters exploit children, orphans,” translated by Egypt Independent from the newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm, August 2, 2013

The photos of a child wearing a shirt with “I am a future martyr” written on it, and of children wearing and carrying burial shrouds (and holding them in a way that suggests they are making offerings to the gods, because in fact they are offering themselves as a sacrifice to death), can be seen on the website of the Egyptian State Information Service: see, “NCCM condemns violation of child rights by Morsi supporters,” report on the press conference of the Secretary-General of the National Council for Childhood and Motherhood, Egyptian State Information Service, Thursday, August 15, 2013 – 7:36 PM, Cairo.

[11] “Pro-Morsi encampments fortify for battle,” by William Booth and Sharaf Al-Hourani, The Washington Post, August 12, 2013

[12] Video: “ ‘Rabaa’ residents criticise pro-Morsi sit-in,” by Mayada Wadnomiry, Ahram Online, Friday July 26, 2013

[13] Photo gallery accompanying the AP article, “Many neighbors tire of pro-Morsi sit-in in Egypt,” by Mariam Rizk, Associated Press, July 20, 2013; photo #4 of 12

The photo can also be seen here.

[14] “Morsi supporters and opponents exchange fire in Giza,” Ahram Online, MENA, Tuesday, July 23, 2013

[15] Three points about Al Ahram.

First, the conflict within Al Ahram is extreme.  For example, on July 4, the day after Morsi was removed from power, Aswat Masriya, a website funded by the Thomas Reuters Foundation (of the news agency Reuters), reported an intense although apparently unsuccessful effort to remove Al Ahram editor-in-chief Abdel Nasser Salama, because he was essentially a Brotherhood operative:

[Excerpt from “Al-Ahram staff cordon editor-in-chief, demanding his sacking” starts here]

A source from Egypt’s largest newspaper, Al-Ahram, said on Thursday that journalists have detained Editor-in-Chief Abdel Nasser Salama, demanding his removal.

Salama was appointed by the Mohamed Mursi administration that was ousted by the army and popular demand on Wednesday.

[Excerpt from “Al-Ahram staff cordon editor-in-chief, demanding his sacking” ends here]

-- “Al-Ahram staff cordon editor-in-chief, demanding his sacking,” Aswat Masriya, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – 4:00 PM

Second, Ahram Online routinely uses language that aids the Brotherhood.  For example, it always refers to Brotherhood encampments as ‘sit-ins,’ although everyone at Ahram Online knows that designation is absurd.  Similarly, when referring to former president Morsi, Ahram Online repeats like a mantra the phrases, “first freely-elected president,” and “first democratically elected president.”

See, for example, “Egypt’s free-falling Muslim Brotherhood loses zero-sum game,” by Hatem Maher, Ahram Online, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, and “Cabinet to consider ‘next step’ after political impasse: Government source,” by Dina Ezzat, Ahram Online, Wednesday, August 7, 2013.

This despite the fact that, according to a Gallup poll, the majority of Egyptians believe Morsi’s election was a) dishonest and b) more dishonest than elections under Mubarak.

The Gallup organization has reported that according to a poll conducted two weeks before the gigantic June 30 demonstrations demanding an end to the Morsi/Brotherhood government, 60% of Egyptians said they did not have confidence in the honesty of elections, compared to 34% who said they did have confidence.  And even fewer – just 30% – thought the honesty of elections had improved since the removal of Hosni Mubarak, while 56% said elections had gotten less honest.

See, “Confidence in government and elections plummeted under Morsi: Gallup,” by Basil El-Dabh, Egypt Daily News, August 3, 2013.

So much for Morsi being the first honestly elected Egyptian president.

And third, given the resistance of rank-and-file reporters, the Ahram editors have to work overtime adding their pro-Brotherhood slant (such as the phrases “first freely elected” and “first democratically elected”) to articles, with sometimes humorous results, as in the following excerpt from a piece about another Brotherhood road-attack:

[Excerpt from “Pro-Morsi protesters march on Cairo’s Salah Salem Road” starts here]

Dozens march to Central Auditing Organisation headquarters, halting traffic for a few hours in eastern Cairo on Salah Salem – a major thoroughfare – the first day of the work week to demand ousted president Mohamed Morsi be reinstated.

Thousands of democratically-elected Morsi supporters – deposed by the military on 3 July following mass protests for his ouster – maintain a sit-in in Rabaa Square close to Salah Salem Road and Nahda Square in Giza and have been staging daily marches around Cairo and other cities across Egypt.

[Our emphasis]

[Excerpt from “Pro-Morsi protesters march on Cairo’s Salah Salem Road” ends here]

-- “Morsi supporters cause congestion on Cairo’s busy Salah Salem Sunday to press for his reinstatement,” Ahram Online, Sunday August 4, 2013

So, the Morsi supporters have been democratically elected. As far as we are concerned, they should be impeached, and the voters should return to the polls.

[16] “Egypt protests hit all-time high during Morsi’s first year: Report,” Ahram Online, Tuesday, June 25, 2013

[17] “71% of Egyptians unsympathetic with pro-Morsi protests: Poll,” Ahram Online, Monday, July 22, 2013

[18] Our assertion that Brotherhood people routinely respond violently to criticism and disagreement is not hyperbole or a joke, as illustrated by an unusually informative Associated Press account of Brotherhood behavior in a Brotherhood stronghold during the constitutional referendum in December 2012:

[Excerpt from “Even province where Egypt’s Islamists won with 90% of the vote, rumblings of discontent are heard” starts here]

Outside a polling station in the village of Sheikh Fadl, one resident complained about Islamists to an Associated Press journalist.

“Look no one in this village read the constitution … [Ellipsis as in original] I can read and write, but I don’t understand the constitution and I couldn’t decide whether to say [yes] or no,” Said Abdel-Moneim, a driver, said.

“But here the Brotherhood knocks doors and brings people out,” he said, “and if someone says no, he gets beaten up.”

A Brotherhood member who overheard him protested — and the two quickly fell into a fistfight, kicking each other and throwing punches.

[...]

Islam Abdullah, a young voter, complained people follow whatever choice well-known clerics bless.

“People here believe the religious scholars. Most of the people didn’t know what to say until Mohammed Hassan came out and said yes. It was over,” he said, referring to a prominent Salafi cleric.

He was interrupted by a passing Brotherhood member. “This is not true. Don’t talk about things you don’t know,” he yelled — and another fistfight broke out.

[Excerpt from “Even province where Egypt’s Islamists won with 90% of the vote, rumblings of discontent are heard” ends here]

-- “Even province where Egypt’s Islamists won with 90% of the vote, rumblings of discontent are heard,” by Maggie Michael, Associated Press, December 25, 2012

[19] “Fresh allegations of torture at pro-Morsy rallies,” edited translation from MENA, Egypt Independent, Saturday, August 3, 2013 – 11:49

[20] “TV channel: More than 20 bodies found below Rabaa Square’s platform,” Aswat Masriya, Wednesday, August 14, 2013 – 11:10 PM

[21] For an example of the Muslim Brotherhood’s customary tactic of committing murder and then loudly claiming that the victim or victims were members of the Brotherhood, consider the assassination of investigative journalist El-Hosseiny Abou Deif, shot on December 5, 2012 during the mass protests against then-President Morsi’s attempts to push through a Brotherhood-designed constitution.

First read the article, “Abu Deif family allege assassination: Friends and family of journalist say he was targeted by Muslim Brotherhood,” in which the friend who was with Deif when he was shot testifies that he was fired on from Brotherhood ranks after gathering video evidence of Brotherhood attacks on protesters.

Then take a look at the article on Abu Deif that appeared on the Ikhwan (Muslim Brotherhood) English language website, “Egypt ‘Journalists for Reform’ Holds National Salvation Front Responsible for Abu-Deif Murder.”  In it the Brotherhood reports that a Brotherhood front group claims Deif was a Brotherhood supporter murdered by the anti-Morsi National Salvation Front.

You can see a video of El-Hosseiny Abou Deif leading chants at a demonstration against the Muslim Brotherhood and in defense of the freedom of the press on December 4, 2013 at the Cairo Press Association (sometimes translated as ‘Press Syndicate’) here.

[22] “Egypt’s Brotherhood figures to stand trial in Sept on torture charges,” by El-Sayed Gamaleddine, Ahram Online, Tuesday, August 13, 2013

[23] “Witness reports suggest torture at pro-Morsi sit-ins: Amnesty,” Ahram Online, Friday, August 2, 2013 

The Amnesty International report can be read here.

[24] Photo gallery accompanying the AP article, “Egypt braces for day of rival rallies,” by Hamza Hendawi and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press, July 25, 2013; photo #8 of 11

The photo can also be seen here.

[25] Photo gallery accompanying the AP article, “Many neighbors tire of pro-Morsi sit-in in Egypt,” by Mariam Rizk, Associated Press, July 20, 2013; photo #8 of 12

The photo can also be seen here.

[26] “Clashes erupt as Islamists push back in Egypt,” by Maggie Michael, Sarah El Deeb and Lee Keath, Associated Press, July 5, 2013, 8:11 PM EDT

[27] Photo gallery: “Egypt rises in anti-Morsi protest,” Yahoo! News Canada, photo #25 of 30


========================================================

You may send this article or the link to any person or Internet list.  You may post any TENC article on the Internet as long as you cite Emperor’s Clothes as the source, credit the author(s), and state the URL, which in this case is
http://emperors-clothes.com/peaceful-sitins-not.htm

Subscribe to the TENC Newsletter – Receive articles from Emperor’s Clothes

To subscribe, send a blank email with SUBSCRIBE in the subject line to: emperorsclothes@tenc.net  You will receive a confirmation email within a day.  (If you don’t, please check your email screening filter.)  Please reply to that email and add the Newsletter address to your personal address book: emperorsclothes@tenc.net

Our readers make TENC possible. Please donate!

The Emperor’s New Clothes (TENC) * www.tenc.net